BLOW-UP

ANTONIONI'S CLASSIC FILM AND PHOTOGRAPHY

30 April 2014 - 17 August 2014

Michelangelo Antonioni's 1966 cult film Blow-Up and its various references to photography are the focus of the Albertina photo exhibit of the same name. For the first time, photographs classified according to thematic emphases will be shown which have proven to be characteristic for Antonioni's film in various respects, and which also illustrate important artistic positions in the history of photography and art.
 
Blow-Up occupies a unique position, not only in the history of film, but also in the history of photography. There is hardly another feature film that has shown the diverse areas of photography in such a differentiated fashion, and which attempts to fathom them in such a detailed and timeless manner. The photographic spectrum in Blow-Up is accordingly broad, extending from fashion photography through social reporting and pop art to abstract photography. The Blow-Up exhibit presents these diverse themes and their relation to one another in several chapters. In addition to film stills, both works that can actually be seen in Blow-Up and photographs illuminating the cultural and artistic context of the film production, London of the Swinging Sixties, will be shown. Among the exhibited photographers are thus found such central artists as David Bailey, Terence Donovan, Richard Hamilton, John Hilliard, Don McCullin, Ian Stephenson, John Stezaker and many more.


In addition to this, the famous photos from Blow-Up of a pair of lovers in a park, taken secretly by the protagonist of Antonioni's story, can also be viewed. The protagonist believes that he has "documented" a murder by chance with these images. However, the photos turn out to provide only ambivalent evidence, because even enlargements or blow-ups of these photos don't reveal the presumed corpse. This cinematic study of the representation of images and their ambivalence has since provided the artistic basis for the works of a variety of contemporary photographers, which demonstrates that Blow-Up has retained its cultural relevance since its creation in 1966.

 

Picture Gallery

 

Veruschka von Lehndorff mit David Hemmings in "Blow Up" (Regie: Michelangelo Antonioni), 1966 
David Hemmings in Blow Up (Regie: Michelangelo Antonioni), 1966 
David Hemmings in Blow Up (Regie: Michelangelo Antonioni), 1966 
David Hemmings in Blow Up (Regie: Michelangelo Antonioni), 1966 
 
Arthur Evans

Models in Blow-Up (Regie: Michelangelo Antonioni), 1966 
Tazio Secchiaroli

David Hemmings und Veruschka von Lehndorff in Blow-Up (Regie: Michelangelo Antonioni), 1966 
Brian Duffy

Jane Birkin, 1960s 
Terence Donovan

The Secrets of an Agent, 1961 
 
Terence Donovan

Man about the Black Country, 1961 
Shezad Dawood

Make it big (Blow-Up), 2002/3 
Don McCullin

Down-and-out begging for help, Aldgate, 1963 
Patrick Hunt

David Bailey am Set von G.G. Passion, 1966 
 
Don McCullin

Thomas’ blow-ups aus dem Park 
Terry O´Neill

David Bailey photographing Moyra Swan, 1965 
Don McCullin

Thomas’ blow-ups aus dem Park - Courtesy Philippe Garner 
Jill Kennington, Blow-Up 
 
David Montgomery: Donyale Luna am Set von Blow-Up, 1966 
Arthur Evans

David Hemmings in Blow-Up (Regie: Michelangelo Antonioni), 1966 - Courtesy Philippe Garner 
David Bailey

Brian Epstein (Box of Pin-Ups), 1965 - V&A Images/Victoria and Albert Museum 
Richard Hamilton

Swingeing London III, 1972, Kunstmuseum Winterthur, purchase 1997, © Schweizerisches Institut für Kunstwissenschaft, Zürich, Jean-Pierre Kuhn 
 
Ian Stephenson

Still Life Abstraction D1, 1957 
Anonym

Werbebild für Blow-Up, 1966 - Courtesy Philippe Garner 
Eric Swayne

Grace and Telma, Italian Vogue, 1966 - Courtesy Tom Swayne 
Don McCullin

British Butcher, East London, c. 1965 © Don McCullin Courtesy Hamiltons Gallery, London 
 
Installation view of the exhibition © Christian Wachter / Albertina Vienna 
Installation view of the exhibition © Christian Wachter / Albertina Wien 
Installationsansicht der Ausstellung © Christian Wachter / Albertina Wien 
Installation view of the exhibition © Christian Wachter / Albertina Wien 

 

Cooperation partner

 

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